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Author Topic: SQ4R - The Modern Strategy of Efficient Learning  (Read 1226 times)

Greetings.  I am Nova Flare Emperor Q.

Here is something I wrote back in 2015 as a base document to use for the advertisting scheme Adfly.
Whilst this profit strategy did not succeed, I feel that many people here, who are studying one thing or another by law, would benefit from this document nevertheless.

Please see the excerpt below:

"S Q 4 R - The Modern Method of Deep Learning (Survey, Question, Read, Record, Recite, Review.)



(---][ IN-DEPTH INSTRUCTION MANUAL START ][---)

What is SQ4R?
-SQ4R is a versatile study strategy because it engages the reader during each phase of the reading process.

-Readers preview/SURVEY (S) the text material to develop predictions and set the purpose for the reading by generating QUESTIONS (Q) about the topic.

-They READ (1R) actively, searching for answers to those questions.

-They monitor their comprehension as they summarize WRITE (2R) & RECITE (3R).

-They evaluate their comprehension through REVIEW (4R) activities.

 

What is READING?
-There are many meanings for reading, but the simplest is to CONSTRUCT MEANING FROM TEXT.

-First and foremost you read for MEANING and UNDERSTANDING.

-The correct READING SPEED is the one that gets you that meaning and understanding.

-Reading is an art form and good readers do certain things that get them the meaning that the process is designed to extract.

-Learning anything involves putting yourself in the proper mode that will help insure that meaning can be gotten from the text.

What you need to know to enhance your comprehension:
1. I begin with what I already know (activating prior knowledge).

2. I always try to make sense of what I am reading (context).

3. I ask myself questions; before, during and after reading.

4. I predict and think about what will happen next in the text, or how my questions will be answered.

5. I read with purpose. I know why I am reading and what I am reading to find out.

6. I know that as a good reader I often REREAD parts of, or even, the whole text two or more times in order to make sense of what I am reading.

 

-Two general learning components must be addressed as you begin the reading process and the SQ4R method will activate them:
-First, place the reading in CONTEXT. What is the reading about and do I have any prior knowledge about this subject to help me extract the meaning that I'm after ?

-The SURVEY and SYSTEMATIC reading puts this process into motion. You get an overview that will "jog your memory" as you search for prior knowledge on the subject.

-Ask questions about what you don't know.

-Make the questions simple and general if you don't have much prior knowledge and more specific if this is an area of study that is familiar to you.

-Using these questions will GUIDE YOUR SPEED AND COMPREHENSION as you attempt to answer them.

-THE STUDENT THAT IS ENGAGED IN READING IS MOTIVATED, STRATEGIC, KNOWLEDGEABLE, AND SOCIALLY INTERACTIVE.

-READING IS A PROCESS THAT MUST INCLUDE THINKING BEFORE, DURING, AND AFTER READING.

 

How to Use It
1. Survey what you are about to read

-Systematic Reading

-Think about the title: What do you know about this subject?

-What do I want to know?

-Glance over headings and/skim the first sentences of paragraphs.

-Look at illustrations and graphic aids.

-Read the first paragraph.

-Read the last paragraph or summary.

2. Question

-Turn the title into a question. This becomes the major purpose for your reading.

-Write down any questions that come to mind during the survey.

-Turn headings into questions.

-Turn subheadings, illustrations, and graphic aids into questions.

-Write down unfamiliar vocabulary and determine the meaning.

3. Read Actively

-Read to search for answers to the objectives.

-Respond to objectives and use context clues for unfamiliar words.

-React to unclear passages, confusing terms, and questionable statements by generating additional questions

4. Recite

-Look away from the answers and the book to recall what was read.

-Recite answers to the objectives aloud or in writing.

-Reread text for unanswered objectives.

5. wRite

-Make "maps" for yourself.

-Reduce the information

-Reread or skim to locate and prove your points.

-Write down the key terms and ideas in outline form or using the Cornell Note Taking System.

-Always read/question/recite before marking or taking down notes.

-Check yourself against the text. Correct and add to your answer.

6. Review

-Answer the major purpose questions.

-Look over answers and all parts of the chapter to organize the information.

-Summarize the information learned by creating a graphic organizer (concept map) that depicts the main ideas, by drawing a flow chart, by writing a summary,

by participating in a group discussion, or by writing an explanation of how this material has changed your perceptions or applies to your life.

 

Study Strategies -- SQ4R
1. Survey : Psych yourself up

2. Question: Use previous knowledge

-Intend to remember.

-Anticipate test questions.

3. Read: Be selective

-Create meaningful organization.

4. Recite: Put ideas in your own words

5. wRite: Make "maps" for yourself

-Reduce the information

6. Review: Further reduce the information

-Find personal applications.

 

1. Survey : Psych yourself up

-a. Title, topic sentence in each paragraph, and introductory paragraph(s).

-b. Headings, subheadings, and italicized words.

-c. Summary at the end of the chapter.

2. Question: Use previous knowledge

-a. Intend to remember.

-b. Anticipate test questions.

-c. Turn each heading and subtitle into a question.

-d. Who? What? When? Where? Why? How?

-e. Restate the objectives from headings to help fix them in your mind.

3. Read: Be selective

-a. Create meaningful organization.

-b. Read only the material covered under one heading or subheading at a time.

-c. Read ideas, not just words.

-d. Read aggressively, with the intent of getting answers, of noting supporting details, and of remembering.

4. Recite: Put ideas in your own words

-a. Look away from the book and then "recite" (out loud) the major concepts of the section.

-b. Check your answers referring to the book.

-c. Answer the questions that you raised before you began to read.

-d. Answer fully, and be sure to include the reasons the author believes the answer is true.

-e. Recall the answer and do not refer to the book.

5. wRite: Make "maps" for yourself

-a. Reduce the information

-b. Reread or skim to locate and prove your points.

-c. Write down the key terms and ideas in outline form or using the Cornell System.

-d. Always read/question/recite before marking or taking down notes.

-e. Check yourself against the text. Correct and add to your answer.

6. Review: Further reduce the information

-a. Find personal applications.

-b. Look over your notes and headings and subheadings in the text. Get an overall view of the main points.

-c. Recall subpoints under each main point.

-d. Aim to do an immediate review and later review. Studies show that with immediate review you can retain 80% of what you covered.

-e. Go back periodically and test yourself to see how much you remember. Don't put off review until the night before the test.

(---][ IN-DEPTH INSTRUCTION MANUAL END ][---)

____________

(<>){}- SUMMARY START -{}(<>)

The first step you'll take with the SQ4R method is SURVEY.  In this step, you'll survey the text you're about to read.  Instead of being intimidated by the size of the chapter, scan the text and learn as much as you can about the MAPS of the chapter.  (MAPS = Main beliefs, Author's attitude, Purpose and Structure.) A great pneumonic for everything you're about to survey is TISH, West Virginia: (TISH = Titles, Introductions, Summaries, Headings.  WV = Words, Visuals.)


The next step you'll take on SQ4R is QUESTION. This step and the following three steps will be repeated for each new heading and subheading you run into.  You'll run into headings and subheadings in your textbook that specify that the following section in the text will be focusing on a certain topic.  With the Questions step, you'll be asking yourself questions for each of the sections of texts.  You can use one of two different methods for this step: MAPS, or turn the headings and subheadings themselves into Questions.  For the MAPS technique, ask yourself the following questions whilst reading through that section of the text:  What are the author's main beliefs?  His or her attitude, tone and biases?  What is the purpose (i.e.  what does the author want me to walk away knowing?)  And what are the organizational structures in place to help me make connections between the main topics?

For turning the Headings into Questions method, you'll be making your own questions based on the headings or subheadings of the section you're about to read.  Using journalistic type questions like Who, What, Where When, Why, or How, are all great ways to start this process.  So for example, if you're about to read a section based on the Civil War, you might ask yourself, 'WHO fought the Civil War?  WHEN was the Civil War fought?  or WHY was the Civil War fought?'


The next step is self explanatory:  READ!  You're going to be reading the section of text under each of the subheadings or headings.  This is the second of four steps that you will do for each section you'll be reading.  While you're reading, remember to think of answers to the questions that you either made up or found using the MAPS questions technique.  You may find that you need to revise your questions as you learn more about the topic - and that's perfectly fine.  Revising the questions means that you're thinking and making sense of the material.


The fourth step of SQ4R, and the third you need to complete for the third section of the text is RECORD.  You'll be recording important information from the text.  The goal of this step is to basically make a study guide for yourself.  During this step, you write down the answers to the questions you made from the READ step.  You may have already written down the questions before you've even read the text - If you've already done the latter, then you've already got half of this step done already.  Now all you have to do is write down your answers.


RECITE is the fifth step of SQ4R, and the final of the four R's that you need to repeat for each section of text.  In this step, you will repeat the questions out loud to yourself that you made for each section, and answer them in your own words.  Answering the questions in your own words will help you to learn the material in a repetitive way without memorizing your answers word-for-word.

Here we are, the final sixth step - REVIEW.  After you've completed the four steps QUESTION, READ, RECORD and RECITE for each section, you're ready to REVIEW the material.  The review step eliminates the need for cramming in for tests.  This step asks you to regularly review the notes you made in the previous steps.  Now, you can do this one of three ways:  First, by using the study guide you created.  Second, by re-surveying the chapter, or by using MAPS for the entire module or section you covered.

(<>){}- SUMMARY END -{}(<>)


S.Q.4.R.  Survey, Question, Read, Record, Recite, Review."

I hope you enjoyed reading this, and I also hope that you optionally apply it in your daily lives, as I am doing.  Regardless of your position, this strategy is a valuable mental tool to leverage information into your mind.

/Discuss, please.

Um. It's SQ3R. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SQ3R
I had to learn about it in my introduction to university class. There is an astonishingly small amount of research on this study method, so little in fact that I found an entire paper devoted to complaining about how little research into the SQ3R studying method. Cornell note taking all the way m8 ;;;;))))

What a bunch of hyper-structured, over-complicated bullstuff. The best learning method is whatever the hell you want. Everyone's brains are wired differently.




this is vaguely school related so im gonna use this opprotunity to complain about compilation notebooks

cons: i forgetin hate compilation notebooks. they dont stay open very well but somehow just good enough to spite you by attempting to open when you close them, as if they are seeking revenge. the far sides of the notebook are unusable due to the way the pages are bound together, and theres this wacky new organizational craze goin on that makes me want to cut my balls off and sell them to a krogan. it consists of taping notes and worksheets to pages, or taping small strips of scrap paper to the page and putting papers inside that. it may not seem that bad, but after like 5 pages the already stuffty qualities of the composition notebok are only compounded upon by the sddition of multiple papers that arent bound with like industrial strength orphan tears or whatever. if i wanted to store papers quickly, efficiently, and in an organized manner id buy a folder but guess what i did and im not allowed to use it because thr loving notebook is a grade now. news flash this just in im going to destroy written language just to avoid this category of notebook.

theres also tiny little composition notebooks just in case you wanted to take like 40 words of notes and a doodle of your richard (read: tiny, little) and then smuggle it into a prison by shoving it up your ass or something. i dont know why i wrote this i feel like a bad You impression and comp notebooks are indirectly linked to my sorrow and frustration so thats another reason.

pros: more durable than a soggy paper airplane in hurricane katrina

Um. It's SQ3R. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SQ3R
I had to learn about it in my introduction to university class. There is an astonishingly small amount of research on this study method, so little in fact that I found an entire paper devoted to complaining about how little research into the SQ3R studying method. Cornell note taking all the way m8 ;;;;))))

SQ3R was the older version, which is what I used to use.  Cornell note taking is great ;;;;))))

This is an effective learning strategy that is used by professors and students around the globe in order to grasp complex concepts, such as nuclear physics.

I was not expecting so negative a response to a tool designed to help you.  I asked for /discussion, not /argue.

SQ3R was the older version, which is what I used to use.  Cornell note taking is great ;;;;))))

This is an effective learning strategy that is used by professors and students around the globe in order to grasp complex concepts, such as nuclear physics.

I was not expecting so negative a response to a tool designed to help you.  I asked for /discussion, not /argue.

What a bunch of hyper-structured, over-complicated bullstuff. The best learning method is whatever the hell you want. Everyone's brains are wired differently.

It's not hyper-structered, it's just too complicated for you to grasp.  If you don't have anything constructive to say, then go away.

I really suck at learning, so finding methods to help me would be great.

I couldn't even concentrate trying to read through this. From what I understand, however, it does nothing to fix the problems and instead is a much more tedious way of learning.

It's not hyper-structered, it's just too complicated for you to grasp.  If you don't have anything constructive to say, then go away.

What a condescending stufflord

It almost seems like you need to know the SQ4R thing to read the SQ4R thing

the way I learn is learn something difficult is first learn it, forget about it and then months later learn it again and bam it's stuck in my head forever

It's not hyper-structered, it's just too complicated for you to grasp.  If you don't have anything constructive to say, then go away.
The fact that you said this to Seventh is almost hilarious.

It almost seems like you need to know the SQ4R thing to read the SQ4R thing
Congratulations, my friend. You've ascended from Comedy Bronze to Comedy Gold, and you have SQ4R to thank for it.