Author Topic: why does everyone use php  (Read 3139 times)

The ones you mentioned don't get enough popularity (except for maybe golang)
Flask (python)
Rails (html/javascript/css/ruby)
Express (javascript?)
GoLang (assembly/c++)
this is so strange. first you imply that go is more popular than python, ruby, or javascript. then you list flask and express as using python and javascript respectively, but rails is for some reason the only one that you decided involves HTML/JS/CSS (which is in fact all of them). and LASTLY you seem to think go is a web framework used with C++?

right now the most popular programming languages are, in order, java, C, C++, python C#, VB.NET, and then PHP
and as for web frameworks (counting out client-sided ones because they're irrelevant to this comparison), we have ASP.NET, rails, ASP.NET MVC, and django, before you get to laravel, the first PHP framework in the list

PHP is popular because it was more accessible than other languages, not because it's more well-designed, faster, or anything meaningful really

right now the most popular programming languages are, in order, java, C, C++, python C#, VB.NET, and then PHP
and as for web frameworks (counting out client-sided ones because they're irrelevant to this comparison), we have ASP.NET, rails, ASP.NET MVC, and django, before you get to laravel, the first PHP framework in the list
That's only half the story though.
You're looking at most popular languages for all use, so of course something only used for web programming is going to fall way down that list. If you look at languages specifically for web programming, PHP is way up there
Secondly, languages aren't frameworks. ASP.NET and MVC are immensely popular as frameworks because you pretty much can't do web programming at all with C# or VB.NET without one of them. Whereas PHP has all the basic things you would need out of the box.

I'd say PHP is popular because it's open source (like the rest of the LAMP stack), can run on anything (unlike something like ASP.NET which requires a Windows server), easier to learn and start with (imo).

It's far from my favorite language, but it was the first web language I learned, and I can see why.

web programming is pretty stupid

i just use whatever's convenient.  i dont care.  for example, right now, im in the middle of implementing a backend but i'm doing it in express.js/node on glitch.  i was bored with using flask and php7 but didnt want to try rails or anything on go, so js sounded cool.
« Last Edit: May 27, 2018, 04:04:50 PM by theviacom »

how do you know I didn't use an .htaccess redirect to make you THINK it was php when in actuality it was ruby, you godamn fool open your eyes everything is not what it seems


how do you know I didn't use an .htaccess redirect to make you THINK it was php when in actuality it was ruby, you godamn fool open your eyes everything is not what it seems

wtf you actually used nginx with a fake .htaccess file to make us think its xampp or something

i got you figured out swanllow

anyone here use cobol

me

I'd say PHP is popular because it's open source (like the rest of the LAMP stack), can run on anything (unlike something like ASP.NET which requires a Windows server), easier to learn and start with (imo).
python, ruby, java, and node are also open source, and run on practically any platform. even .NET, with .NET Core, is open source and cross-platform, although that's pretty recent. and I don't think that PHP, as a language, is any easier to learn than the others, particularly python and ruby. it's just popular because it's convenient. and it is, once you have it installed, running new code is just a matter of putting a file in a directory. it's a lot easier to just get something simple going quickly. and that can be nice, particularly for reusable software like forums or whatever
how do you know I didn't use an .htaccess redirect to make you THINK it was php when in actuality it was ruby, you godamn fool open your eyes everything is not what it seems
.htaccess is irrelevant to rails, and also you wouldn't use a redirect at all, you can just make your routes end with ".php"

php is what old people use. if you program in C you dont get invited to parties. use this hot new js library and make everything laggy and never test on mobile, its the programmer way

this is so strange. first you imply that go is more popular than python, ruby, or javascript. then you list flask and express as using python and javascript respectively, but rails is for some reason the only one that you decided involves HTML/JS/CSS (which is in fact all of them). and LASTLY you seem to think go is a web framework used with C++?
I'm saying what those were composed of. I'm not saying those major languages aren't popular, just the custom languages and what they're made of in (). I think you're just misunderstanding what I was explaining.

right now the most popular programming languages are, in order, java, C, C++, python C#, VB.NET, and then PHP
and as for web frameworks (counting out client-sided ones because they're irrelevant to this comparison), we have ASP.NET, rails, ASP.NET MVC, and django, before you get to laravel, the first PHP framework in the list
Ah thanks for helping my point, we're talking about the composed languages, not those major languages (other than PHP); good sources but misunderstanding what I was saying - or I'm just not wording this post properly

PHP is popular because it was more accessible than other languages, not because it's more well-designed, faster, or anything meaningful really
Never said it was faster or well-designed, just the most used/supported language on most/all platforms.