Author Topic: Cross-Eye Stereographic  (Read 2631 times)

Cross-Eye Stereographic is a method of illusion to create depth. Akin to Anaglyphs the viewer can perceive multiple planes of projection which basically gives you the illusion of a viewing subject to be 3D. However, unlike Anaglyphs and closer to actual 3D Stereograms, you do not lose color information.
This is done by crossing your eyes - if you can't do that it's unfortunately nothing you can take advantage from here. Crossing eyes should not have any medical concerns although prolonged cross eyes might give you eye strains or headaches - but this is not something that will last, as ultimately eyes are controlled my mere muscles and they should be able to relax in less than one hour.
The left image corresponds to the right eye, while the right image corresponds to the left eye. When crossing your eyes you should try to overlap the two images you see - preferably looking for similar objects or colors, and then attempt to focus on the combined image you see.
Here's a simple example image to get you started if you have not done this before. You should be able to focus and differentiate between the squares' planes of projection. If you can form a clear image with your eyes on this it should be easy to then move on to the actual set of (argruably small amount of) screenshots.

The screenshots themselves are extremely easy to make, just take a screenshot, move a bit to the right (or left) and take another screenshot, knowing that the right image corresponds to the left eye and vice-versa.
You should not be viewing close to the screen - if you extend your arm and you can touch your screen it should be enough (30+cm away) - this is because the image becomes disorted when you stare close to the screen (third perspective point).
I hope this was clear enough to be able to experience this, it's very possible not everybody might be able to cross eye, nonetheless focus on it..
Note that it's particularly difficult to focus around the horizontal borders of the images, and it should be avoided. (Not that it can cause issues or anything, but you don't always have the exact same thing to focus on)

These should be easier to focus on with higher amount of detail, but lose field of view.


« Last Edit: October 02, 2016, 11:02:38 AM by LeetZero »

neat i love stuff like this

Haven't been able to do this properly for many years

oya i remember doing this

It took me much longer than I want to admit trying to figure out how to get my eyes to focus while crossed.
God damn

this method never worked for me


One of my eyes actually just drifts off to the left and the other one stays still so I cant really Cross my eyes

i have really lazy eyes so i see partially cross-eyed 24/7 but it's really hard for me to cross my eyes to the point where the images match up in the op
though it worked fine when i zoomed my screen out

The images are too far apart

It helps if you're on mobile or just zoom way the hell out and try it

i have really lazy eyes so i see partially cross-eyed 24/7 but it's really hard for me to cross my eyes to the point where the images match up in the op
though it worked fine when i zoomed my screen out
The images are too far apart

You should not be viewing close to the screen - if you extend your arm and you can touch your screen it should be enough (30+cm away) - this is because the image becomes disorted when you stare close to the screen (third perspective point).
It's not a golden rule, you can also go further if you can't cross your eyes enough. I personally do it at arm length on a 1080p screen.


I had to check the comparison images twice before I actually got what this was supposed to mean.

Haha NICE! I use this technique for spot the difference ;)

I like this one the most, feels more 3D than the others
« Last Edit: October 03, 2016, 11:22:10 AM by Daniel.S »