Author Topic: The music production & Composition (mega)thread  (Read 9718 times)

I don't like the idea of thinking you need an brown townog synth (or any specific piece of gear) if you're serious about making electronic music. it's all to taste. you can make most any digital toy synth sound good if you use it to its strengths. I'm definitely not saying brown townog synths don't sound good. If you really want that sound then absolutely go for it, but that sound isn't so crucial to everybody's style.

sidenote: I can't tell, but I think some people might be confusing physical with brown townog synths. brown townog synths have a signal path that is made up of 100% brown townog circuitry, it does not go through any digital chips. This can add a warmer feel to the oscillators as well as other small unpredictable changes that digital synths aren't quite able to replicate.
You can have physical digital synths too, digital does not just mean a VST on your computer.

All physical instruments have to be serviced at some point, that is definitely a given.
Yes, but with vintage synths in particular there's the added issue of specialized components that are no longer manufactured; for example, Roland's highly-regarded Juno synths and their failure-prone voice chips.

The particular things, in the way that they apply to brown townog synths, that I described, are in fact particular to brown townog synths
I was referring to what Mega-Bear was saying, since it seemed like he was conflating the term "brown townog" with "hardware", as Brickman is describing.

If anyone wants my startup template for fl
Only certified pro's and cool kids color code their fire mixtapes

^clicky

i really should sort my tracks like not stuff damn it forget

i only organize my projects when they show promise because my ambition to finish songs is weak enough to be halted by housecleaning


unfinished projects.jpg

I too love working on 20 different things at the same time

i never finish my projects 😂

i never finish my projects 😂
tbh I only have 1 finished project too but I just ripped some melodies for that somewhere so I guess that doesnt count

altho my new futurefunk esque thingy is almost done so I guess that counts.

my composition professor wants me to try out cubase, but I've shown interest in fl ever since I first learned about it

thoughts

my composition professor wants me to try out cubase, but I've shown interest in fl ever since I first learned about it

thoughts
Cubase is definitely more of a professional-level DAW (although I think Pro Tools is still the industry standard), so if you have any plans of working at a recording studio it may be a good idea to get an understanding of it beforehand. At their core, DAWs are mostly the same, the main differences between them would be their GUI and hardware/software (VSTs, etc) support. FL Studio gets a lot of stuff, but it's certainly a capable DAW in the right hands; the problem with it is that it's usually everyone's first DAW, and beginner's hands aren't the right hands.

Cubase is definitely more of a professional-level DAW (although I think Pro Tools is still the industry standard), so if you have any plans of working at a recording studio it may be a good idea to get an understanding of it beforehand. At their core, DAWs are mostly the same, the main differences between them would be their GUI and hardware/software (VSTs, etc) support. FL Studio gets a lot of stuff, but it's certainly a capable DAW in the right hands; the problem with it is that it's usually everyone's first DAW, and beginner's hands aren't the right hands.
iirc avicii and martin garrix use fl. I say start with fl because learning curve and then learn Cubase. Its always nice to know how to use more programs.

Also any good brackets to wall mount synths/keyboards?
« Last Edit: March 10, 2018, 05:32:20 AM by espio100 »

I'm interested in gear that people own or are saving up for, and what they use that gear for/why they're saving up for it.

I'd say my most used piece of equipment is my microkorg. I use it as my central midi control keyboard and I use it for nearly all of the synth parts in my songs, unless I need something more complex or something with more voices. In that case I would probably use Live's Operator or Massive.

Second to that would have to be the pairing of my guitars/bass and my roland sp404sx sampler. I love the sound you can get just by sampling parts of guitar playing and mangling it into something crazy. A lot of the textures on songs I make are from short reversed guitar samples.

I really would like to save up for an OP-1 some day but I can't really justify buying more equipment without making more music first. I don't want to become one of those gear hoarders who never makes music (even if i already am one). but the mobility of it and the pitch sampling function on it really intrigues me

Saving up for a komplete kontrol s88 and some monitors for when I move
Currently have an alesis v25 or something, cheap stuff.

Will have it by april or something.

I'm interested in gear that people own or are saving up for, and what they use that gear for/why they're saving up for it.
I'm at a point where pretty much every piece of equipment I'm eyeing are studio utilities rather than sound generators (for example, a patchbay and an 8-channel mixer are at the top of my wantlist right now). Once you get your bases covered with a synth for each main type of synthesis (subtractive and FM), a decent sampler, and an adequate multi-FX unit, there really isn't much more to get (besides more expensive versions of what you already have, which may or may not be worth it depending on what it's replacing).

For anyone just getting into hardware, I suggest you really take the time to learn about what it is you're looking for so you can buy things that will serve you well, and do so for a long time. I frequently see posts on synth communities from people who are constantly buying and selling equipment because they buy whatever catches their eye without actually considering whether or not it would be of use to them. "Gear acquisition syndrome", as it's jokingly referred to, runs rampant in synth circles.

"Gear acquisition syndrome", as it's jokingly referred to, runs rampant in synth circles.
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Everybody knows that every synth adds 10 skill points
More synths = more skill, duh!