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Author Topic: Why u shuld all installation Linix rn, tbh  (Read 1182 times)

No thanks, I see Linux being a fun platform for programmers but not for normal everyday users, this comes from me who did an intership for two years that had computers which were powered by Linux, and quite honestly I don't see much of a reason to use it for people who are not big computer nerds.

I've used visual studio in a professional development setting(for about 3 years), I know enough about it to say its a buggy, piece of stuff software that is so incomplete it needs 30 million plugins to work correctly at all in any workplace.

if you want an brown townogy: its missing so many features that it's like if I sold you a car without mirrors, wheels or windows

you guys can't argue this I swear to god, if any of you have any real world experience I can tell you that i've never need anyone use windows for anything other than windows based development. every single software engineer I know uses linux or mac, it's indisputably better

What do you use instead?

Okay I can talk. I'm home and don't have three different managers getting on me about having my phone out at work.

i met some guy in high school who had autism and would always slip in some smartass comment about the computers he was using in class aren't as good as his custom linux laptop. he actually brought it to school one day and took notes only in the command line terminal and wrote some completely fake save command that i know as a mac user isnt valid unix syntax and closed his stuff down and made some comment on how he took notes efficiently. since then i've just given up on linux users entirely

im guessing the majority of you forgeters aren't that bad but using command line for everyday loving tasks like creating or saving files really pisses me the forget off. you're either using command line for important stuff or you're wasting your computer's potential on an underperforming OS and keeping your desktop looking pretty with some transparent glass theme like a whole tool
You act like those types of stuffheads are exclusive to Linux. They're everywhere! They're not even more common on Linux, just more annoying because they're wannabe Linux hipsters. Like mac hipsters, but worse.


Anyway. Now that I can, let me be clear "What I use Linux for".

I use it for everything I used Windows 7 for.

I spend a tiny fraction of my time actually working on software. It's a hobby. Gaming, chat, and multimedia are hardly different from Windows.

I finally switched when Windows 7's failing support began to become apparent. I was having driver crashes in some workloads, odd problems with support for the latest TLS versions, even Skype was causing my system to misbehave. I wasn't going to go to Windows 10. I hate the telemetry, the interface, the search function, the ads, the updates, the bugs. Microsoft could not have designed an OS that was less appealing to me.

Four years ago, I would have done anything to hold out. I would have stuck with Windows 7. I might have even sucked it up, and moved to Windows 10 anyway. But I'd already been running Fedora on my laptop for months. It's  different now. Linux isn't just for devs anymore. I only even open the terminal for low-level or remote tasks (Or if I'm board, I might open and close it several times trying to find something to do).

I don't have weird crashes, Skype doesn't freeze up my system when sharing the desktop, nearly all my software troubles are resolved. I didn't have to shell out for a mac, or give up my privacy, and It cost me nothing.

On top of that, I have to choice of exactly what I want out of my machine. The plain and industrial look and feel of Windows 7 followed me over, but I could have chosen any look or style with way less trouble than I had getting a second start bar for my second monitor on Windows.

It doesn't matter if you understand, or even if you want to. The fact is, Linux works. It just does. It's available for free, it's customizable in ways that even Windows isn't, often right out of the box, and there are no forced updates with bugs that delete your documents, of heavy costs for the hardware it runs on.


linux is also a lot more lightweight than windows and boots a hell of a lot faster. its security is debatably on the same level or worse than microsoft.

phantos, since you code exclusively in higher level programming languages you don’t encounter the problems people coding on low level languages do in windows. its objectively easier to use linux for those languages since linux gives you better control of and information on things like process resource usage, memory allocation, compiling, file linkage, service packages, etc. and entirely through keyboard only input. for windows youd have to navigate a bunch of windows with mouse and install a bunch of stuff to do the same, on top of an os that runs slower by default.

its also a lot easier to duplicate installs and configuration compared to windows cause linux is free and making an iso of it will copy exactly over to other machines/vms. meanwhile windows requires a license key for each machine and is on average way more resource intensive (and thus unideal to vm)

all in all linux is just another os that just gives more power to the user - this is not necessarily a good thing for average consumers. windows closes off some of that power in favor of simplifying usability and increasing security. macos takes that a step further.

linux is also a lot more lightweight than windows and boots a hell of a lot faster. its security is debatably on the same level or worse than microsoft.

phantos, since you code exclusively in higher level programming languages you don’t encounter the problems people coding on low level languages do in windows. its objectively easier to use linux for those languages since linux gives you better control of and information on things like process resource usage, memory allocation, compiling, file linkage, service packages, etc. and entirely through keyboard only input. for windows youd have to navigate a bunch of windows with mouse and install a bunch of stuff to do the same, on top of an os that runs slower by default.

its also a lot easier to duplicate installs and configuration compared to windows cause linux is free and making an iso of it will copy exactly over to other machines/vms. meanwhile windows requires a license key for each machine and is on average way more resource intensive (and thus unideal to vm)

all in all linux is just another os that just gives more power to the user - this is not necessarily a good thing for average consumers. windows closes off some of that power in favor of simplifying usability and increasing security. macos takes that a step further.
Linux security is actually pretty amazing, especially if you consider SELinux.

Well, it doesn't have Windows Hello, but that's a rather small trade-off.

gentoo doesn't have systemd(ick), and isn't for newcigarettes.

the reason i say its security is same or worse is cause theres no financial incentive for serious security experts to really stress test the os and ensure its secure. on top of that the massive numbers of distros means something not a security issue on one distro may be a threat on another. theres also no centralized forced auto update system you can absolutely trust, unlike microsoft’s central update servers and enforced distribution. the average consumer isnt tech savvy enough to secure themselves against external threats, and linux doesnt baby them in doing so. windows does.

at any given point in time it (any given single distro) may be more, same, or less secure than windows/mac. but the times it will be less secure is almost certainly going to be more often than when its same or more due to the lack of incentives for expensive testing and fixes. its really just a matter of money in this case - microsoft literally pays people to ensure their systems security, while linux depends on an ephemeral mass of volunteers who come and go on a regular basis
« Last Edit: March 18, 2019, 12:02:16 AM by Conan »

the reason i say its security is same or worse is cause theres no financial incentive for serious security experts to really stress test the os and ensure its secure. on top of that the massive numbers of distros means something not a security issue on one distro may be a threat on another. theres also no centralized forced auto update system you can absolutely trust, unlike microsoft’s central update servers and enforced distribution.

at any given point in time it (any given single distro) may be more, same, or less secure than windows/mac. but the times it will be less secure is almost certainly going to be more often than when its same or more due to the lack of incentives for expensive testing and fixes. its really just a matter of money in this case - microsoft literally pays people to ensure their systems security, while linux depends on an ephemeral mass of volunteers who come and go on a regular basis
Security is where companies like Red Hat and SUSE come in. Red Hat in particular takes security rather seriously.

Linux itself is quite secure. In the end it's always down to admins and users to keep systems secure and make not retarded decisions, regardless of the OS in question.

gentoo doesn't have systemd(ick), and isn't for newcigarettes.
I enjoy putting minimal effort in to get things up and keep them running. If you want to use gentoo, that's fine, but systemd is a small price to pay for not having to spend hours tweaking and configuring. I have many systems to maintain, and not a lot of time every day.

yes, for professionals, its on them to keep their system secure. but the average consumer cannot be assumed to be able to do so. linux was never and is never going to be a system intended for end users, while ms and macos are always developed with the end user in mind first.

yes, for professionals, its on them to keep their system secure. but the average consumer cannot be assumed to be able to do so. linux was never and is never going to be a system intended for end users, while ms and macos are always developed with the end user in mind first.
I think the folks working on Mint and ElementaryOS would have something to say there, but really only time will can tell. Stranger things have happened in the software industry.

how much of this information is important to anyone? how many memory leaks are you battling on your day to day exploration of linux?
thats really all there is to it. im gonna create my own distro called Cactius and all the window uis are going to be transparent and use courier for all text on every window and the wallpaper is going to be a low-poly cactus in a low poly desert rendered in blender in 10 minutes and embedded in the sand there's gonna be meters that show your blood sugar level and a radial dial that controls your AC in the bedroom. And then i'll get a million loving downloads because linux users are loving hacks with no purpose in life
this is true, I can't loving stand those useless rainmeter things or whatever the forget people use



im shaking in my boots due to how insecure i am