Author Topic: controversial statement s  (Read 17093 times)

ayo the nuclear sauce on da wings hit different

i mean da insane sauce pretty good but sometimes i wanna taste the food yknow

why am i posting in controversial statements i am speaking only the truth

here's my controversial state. minecraft loving sucks. terraria is better in every single aspect.

here's my controversial state. minecraft loving sucks. terraria is better in every single aspect.
i mean early mc was good because of very low complexity + unique "do whatever you want" mechanic that differentiated them but when mojang bought mc amd basically made it 3d terraria but stuffty

i mean early mc was good because of very low complexity + unique "do whatever you want" mechanic that differentiated them but when mojang bought mc amd basically made it 3d terraria but stuffty
what similarities do minecraft and terraria share specifically

what similarities do minecraft and terraria share specifically
mojang is adding unnecessary items and weapons; progression-forcing elements, exploration based content, etc etc

wait do you mean microsoft when you say mojang

what game doesn't have items and weapons? or progression barriers? or content you only get to see if you explore? all of these points can apply to a lot of games

man, i hate that minecraft added health. they're copying call of duty now; they have ranged weapons, a way to express to the player how close you are to dying, sounds upon being hit, damn, it's all lining up

what game doesn't have items and weapons? or progression barriers? or content you only get to see if you explore? all of these points can apply to a lot of games
yah but the whole point of mc is simplicity and creativity; adding unnecessary bloat like new nether biomes not only desimplifies the game but also forces more time to be spent exploring and less time for the creative base-building that is literally the selling point of the game

i don't know what kind of things you would add to minecraft aside from progression/exploration stuff. having a hard time thinking of anything. its core gameplay is entirely centered around exploration, though historically there have been few material end goals that push you in any particular direction. so it makes perfect design sense that they've taken the direction they have. i think it's cool that they're making the nether more relevant by putting things aside from wither skulls there.

yah but the whole point of mc is simplicity and creativity; adding unnecessary bloat like new nether biomes not only desimplifies the game but also forces more time to be spent exploring and less time for the creative base-building that is literally the selling point of the game
that's a pretty valid view, although i think you are mistaken that it's the 'main selling point.' totally understand if you're saying that's the part of the game you really enjoy though, for tons of people that's the near-exclusive appeal of minecraft. and for those people you have creative mode. tbh i can only really play minecraft heavily modded these days, and when i do there's always a big focus on cutting out the need for manual exploration and extraction of resources and instead focusing on building up your central base. modded minecraft is basically a different game tho honestly

items are selectable solutions to problems in-game. the game throws a problem and ideally the player has to find and choose the right solution(s) to tackle the problem. games with good mechanical design that present unique and interesting problems will generally have unique and interesting solutions (or items) too. games with stuffty minmax-based mechanics like damage or health or defense have only one solution to the problem: have more health, do more damage, have higher defense. that's the intended solution, and the items will naturally offer this solution through arbitrary bonuses (+5 hp, +3 damage). games that have number minmax as an actual intended mechanic are well abstracted and easy to play but are poorly designed. the solution to having low defense will ALWAYS be to equip an item that offers the highest bonus to defense, and vice versa. this makes the solution feel mindless and dumb.

it all boils down to how abstract the game mechanics are. games with abstract mechanics like position-based stuff or verticality pose easy to understand problems with flexible complexity solutions. blocks in Minecraft are breakable and that's an easy to understand abstraction of matter in real life. the complexity of the solutions is up to the player: you can use an axe to chop down one tree, or 10 blocks of TNT to destroy a forest. both are viable solutions but range in complexity for solving the same problem, and the complex solution is more rewarding emotionally and statistically (you feel smart and you have more wood). some crafting recipes follow similar suit, as you can use coal or charcoal interchangeably which changes how you approach the game, from either blowing up forests or blowing up caves. and, the enemies can be blown up too. its a complex solution to many problems, all thanks to how well abstracted minecraft is.

in terraria you have a health bar. you can increase your health in multiple ways (items, potions) but all of the methods of increasing your health are simple and don't offer any level of complexity or room for synergy. in that sense terraria is content bloated with multiple, easy solutions to the same problem and is not a good game. minecraft has multiple solutions of varying complexity that can tackle multiple problems, and all of the items in the game are very deliberate for this goal, which is why there aren't 100 different axes or pickaxes, but only one (of varying quality)

[both minecraft and terraria have building as a mechanic but only one really builds the game around it]
« Last Edit: July 12, 2020, 05:53:09 PM by PhantOS »

what game doesn't have items and weapons? or progression barriers? or content you only get to see if you explore? all of these points can apply to a lot of games
kirby. the enemies function as self-contained problems and solutions

kirby. the enemies function as self-contained problems and solutions
NO in kirby i cant jump to the last level. That's a progression barrier and its a bad game