Author Topic: Game Design Megathread  (Read 273181 times)


BLF Game Design Megathread







discuss game design, game design theory, game design advanced theory, and the concept art you've been dying to share with the rest of the world! (and also help spare the pixel art and drawing threads of design docs and mockups)

got an idea you're dying to share? go wild! we (and 'we' includes at least one professional (... artist)) will painstakingly pick it apart and give you fair-handed, even criticism. and then probably insult you. we don't care about size or scale, 2d or 3d, feasibility or practicality, or even if it's cool or not. we will probably insult you either way.

(remember, it's the blockland forums we're talking about)

the above series of gifs were made using LICEcap. use it to post low-intensity videos to this thread, instead of using youtube



tips and tricks from the community:
Quote
programmers, artists, and devs alike are all people like everyone else. don't put them up on a pedestal, because eventually you'll have to deal with them as peers

don't get ahead of yourself. before you get started be sure to ask yourself if you can realistically complete a project. great ideas get left on the cutting room floor because people abandon them midway through, because they feel they can't do them justice

expand your horizons! play indie games, play triple-a, play sports. you can garner information and inspiration from just about anywhere

if you second guess something, second guess it right: do the rubber ducky test. explain, in the most clear and concise possible way, your idea or concept to an inanimate object (like, say, a rubber duck) and listen to yourself. if you see any holes in your explanation, double back and patch them up yourself. the ducky won't mind, so neither should you

learn to mod blockland. it's an amazing sandbox for testing out game theory and observing player tendencies. it'll also teach you to persevere through projects, because lord knows you're gonna be enduring something when you start up a server.

Where should I start?

That depends on what you want to do? 3D or 2D? Once you've decided on which route you'd like to go find a game engine that supports that feature. Some engines support both while others are catered to one or the other. I personally believe that if you want to design a 2D game then you do not need the giant over head a 3D engine provides. There are many quirks to a 3D engine that make them vastly more complicated and because of this you should avoid them when designing a 2D game. On the other hand you may become quite experienced with the 3D engine after developing your game and in this case you might see the benefit of sticking to what you know and adding features that 2D engines cannot support.

I would also like to say don't go in with any preconceived prejudices gained from others. When designing games it's very important to keep an open mind. Don't knock it before you try it, you might find you like it and that it is really efficient at what it does. You may not enjoy programming so certain engines might not be desirable to you. However engines like Unity provide visual programming rather than typing out the code and math behind it which makes it easier for those who can't stare at a sheet of code without their eyes crossing into the next universe.

So you've picked your engine and you know the kind of game you want to make but what now?

Learn the engine. Look up some tutorials. After you've finished a couple tutorials you won't feel so lost in the program and you can finally focus on what you really want to do. Now go do it. You will hit snags. I follow the 24 hour bang your head against the wall rule before asking for help. I've been stumped before and I will be stumped again but I usually figure it out within the first couple of hours of testing and researching. If you hit a snag and nothing seems to be working then take a break, come back with a clear head and try again.

Prototyping.

When developing a game you want to focus less on how the game looks and more on how it plays. Use primitives that represent the idea of what they are suppose to do. Using this approach you can rapidly prototype your games and figure out what feature might be too complicated for your game thus saving you from having to throw out some animation you worked tirelessly on.

Create a couple levels that represent the different features you'd like your game to have and before you decide to start importing your art make sure those levels and features were fun to play. If you don't find yourself itching to play again then don't expect the people who end up playing your game to pick up your game more than once.

While you are prototyping you may find better ways to implement features you've already made. Go back and redo it. It will save you a lot of head ache in the long run if the implementation is elegant rather than stuck together with glue and duct tape.

You should design game mechanics that can be used in more than one way and is something worth striving for. I mean this in both game play and in structure.

Art.

Are you an artist? No? You can become one. Don't want to? Find someone who already is and is just as eager as yourself to make games.
For those who are but don't know of any programs that they can utilize here's a small list:

FREE
MSPAINT
Paint.net
Inkscape
Gimp
Graphics Gale (Free version)

BUY
Adobe products
Corel products
Graphics Gale
PyxelEdit
Pro-Motion

Some of these are great for retro art while others are great for art that requires great detail. Conceptualize and conceptualize again. Eventually you'll find a design you enjoy enough to want to base a game off of.
« Last Edit: March 21, 2014, 10:45:58 PM by Bushido »






Tetsujin, for http://www.gbjam.net/
3 days to go. gotta figure out wallruns, enemies, stage progression. i'm really cutting it close here

I sent you a steam invite last night I believe. Probably going to ask some questions about gamemaker and such once I get started on it. I'm also learning some C# on the side to work in XNA.

From what I've read on Reddit programming games full time as an indie is not a very good idea. Either get a programming job in a large studio or grab some miscellaneous programming job literally anywhere and do game programming on your free time.

i personally take up a lot of pixel art and concept art jobs on the side, so working on other people's games is my real source of income at this current juncture

but yeah going whole-hog in that respect doesn't seem like the smartest idea ever

i have an idea for a game, do a background of a prison shower in a first person view wit two arms and soap in one hand, when you push start the soap slips and you have to mash different keys to stop the soap from dropping if you drop it instead of game over it says prepare your star fish

As for an actual serious idea, I would love to see a shopping game in the style of surgeon simulator, You would have a list of items to buy and put them your basket and then have to put them through a self checkout machine.

A realistic jousting simulator I want one.

A realistic jousting simulator I want one.
"You done been ka-nocked off yo' dang hoss."

Bushido, you could have just made a  thread called "bushido's games" and you would still have a good place to post your game gifs.

i feel strongly that you made this thread just so you could have an excuse to post your gifs.

Anyways..

I think people need to explore on their own Also, don't be too excited and buy a game engine with no direction.

i have an idea for a game, do a background of a prison shower in a first person view wit two arms and soap in one hand, when you push start the soap slips and you have to mash different keys to stop the soap from dropping if you drop it instead of game over it says prepare your star fish
then you can put it up on steam greenlight!

what do you use to actually make games
is it just Cwhatever or..?

Bushido, you could have just made a  thread called "bushido's games" and you would still have a good place to post your game gifs.

i feel strongly that you made this thread just so you could have an excuse to post your gifs.

I can see why you'd say this since all the examples are his own but the thread does address some users who do design games such as myself.


then you can put it up on steam greenlight!
And then you use clever referral schemes to get greenlit!

Because game + steam = lods of emone

then you can put it up on steam greenlight!

what do you use to actually make games
is it just Cwhatever or..?
IIRC, Bushido uses Game Maker. I use LÖVE, and LoserHero uses Flash (I think).

You can also use Unity, Unreal, PyGame, and many other available tools.
« Last Edit: November 07, 2013, 03:39:54 PM by Kingdaro »

IIRC, Bushido uses Game Maker. I use LÍVE, and LoserHero uses Flash (I think).

You can also use Unity, Unreal, PyGame, and many other available tools.
I thought bushdio used C+ or whatever