Author Topic: DESKTOP/COMPUTER STATION THREAD 2021 EDITION  (Read 6425 times)


i don't mean to be aggressive or mean here, i just want to dispel some myths that are apparently going around about linux

Imagine having to forget around for an hour in the console to install python, java, or whatever code language
on my system, the keystroke i use to open my terminal is Win+Enter. so what i would do to install these languages is open up the terminal, and type
Code: [Select]
pacman -S python jdk-openjdk
and after accepting a few prompts, both python and java are fully installed on my computer. that's all there is to it. honestly, i find it a lot simpler than having to browse through someone's poorly designed website just to find a download (looking at you java)

an editor thats not as dogstuff as vi, vim or nano
i share the same sentiment. fortunately, there's tons of free or open sourced IDE's that you can get on your linux distro. i use visual studio code for my day to day programming work and it functions flawlessly for everything i throw at it. if you want a more fully featured IDE, i've used intellij before on my system and again it works pretty much flawlessly

a window manager
imo this is one of the pitfalls of linux. i've tried using a microsoft windows style desktop environment before (KDE plasma) and it sucked complete balls. rn i'm using i3-gaps which is really cool because you use keybinds to do anything you want on your system. i'm pretty good at memorizing keybinds and i always learn them for whatever software i'm using so i3-gaps works really well for me. i feel like it improves my productivity by a lot. however, for other users who want a more MS windows style experience, you might find that linux doesn't really provide a good alternative for it

an entire new filesystem
this is honestly the biggest non-difference between linux and windows. if you're using i3-gaps, install something like thunar and you can browse your files exactly as you do in windows explorer. more fully featured desktop environments will come with thunar or an equivalent file explorer by default. there is technically a difference between linux and windows filesystems, but the differences are so nuanced that you would have to be a super nerd to even know or notice the differences (like how ext4 or ntfs handles partitions or files and stuff like that)

a compiler
most linux OS's come with the GNU toolchain which is basically all you need for compiling most software

7 gojillion dependencies
can't speak for other package managers, but pacman sorts that out for you. should be noted that windows also has a ton of dependencies, they're just handled in the background just like any good package manager will do for you

literally just use windows and double click a .exe file to install an IDE and start
having a good package manager really changes the linux experience a lot. imo, apt is really difficult to use especially when installing some software where you need to add custom repos and stuff. i use pacman and the AUR which means that for 90% of the software i use, all i have to do is type a single command into the terminal and the software is installed for me with no problems. for the other 10% of the software, i do have to manually make it but that's usually bc i made my own modifications to that software

the thing about linux is that it is not at all supposed to be a operating system for the common user. i know i sound like a pretentious roosterhead for saying that but its honestly true. if you use linux you need to be prepared to set aside the one-time cost of learning how to use the terminal and learning how to install stuff correctly. stuff is non-intuitive by nature but that does not mean that the baby should be thrown out with the bathwater. i've been using linux for over a year at this point and if i went back to windows it would seriously harm my productivity bc there's just a ton of stuff that's way easier on linux. developing stuff on linux is a piece of cake, and installing required libraries and stuff for your software projects is just 1000x easier than windows from my experiences (i've had to compile DLL's for my software in the past for additional features. i've spent 10 hours on compiling just one before b/c i didn't have exactly the right setup needed for the DLL. on linux, compiling equivalent bullstuff is an absolute piece of cake - enter the terminal and just type make, and it'll work problem free 100% of the time). that being said, windows is also good for its own reasons. for instance, it has super good software support. you won't be finding anyone running photoshop on linux. the way i see it, pick the OS that you like the best and that best fits your wants and needs

bruh I had ubuntu for two years worst two years of my life so glad to get windows

Im very loving curious at the i5 running at 5.9 ghz

my gigabyte mobo has been running this UEFI beta for years and doesn't report the GHz right. its actually at 4.2GHz

bruh I had ubuntu for two years worst two years of my life so glad to get windows
retard

(click to expand, these are massive images)


RISC is da future


Imagine having to forget around for an hour in the console to install python, java, or whatever code language, an editor thats not as dogstuff as vi, vim or nano, a window manager, an entire new filesystem, a compiler, 7 gojillion dependencies, the lost son of Abraham and the blood sacrifice of a virgin woman to get the bare minimum to start developing software
either you have never tried to use linux or you are simply too stupid to accomplish simple and straightforward tasks
using MSVC with literally anything that isn't VS is either an ungodly hassle or virtually impossible. it's literally easier to install mingw and use gcc than it is to use microsoft's software on microsoft's operating system

Imagine having to forget around for an hour in the console to install python, java, or whatever code language, an editor thats not as dogstuff as vi, vim or nano, a window manager, an entire new filesystem, a compiler, 7 gojillion dependencies, the lost son of Abraham and the blood sacrifice of a virgin woman to get the bare minimum to start developing software

literally just use windows and double click a .exe file to install an IDE and start
imagine carrying such a disdain for completely free software

bruh I had ubuntu for two years worst two years of my life so glad to get windows
merry christmas to your third world stuffhole bro. hope the os made everything worth the struggle.

using MSVC with literally anything that isn't VS is either an ungodly hassle or virtually impossible
amen holy stuff i'm never getting those hours of my life back

either you have never tried to use linux or you are simply too stupid to accomplish simple and straightforward tasks
using MSVC with literally anything that isn't VS is either an ungodly hassle or virtually impossible. it's literally easier to install mingw and use gcc than it is to use microsoft's software on microsoft's operating system
yeah, i dont know what the forget hes talking about. installing stuff on windows is godawful. like holy stuff you have to forget around with the registry sometimes as well and anyone whos installed something that requires env variables or some kinds of automatic deployments knows windows is stuff.

like installing stuff on linux you literally dont even have to google how to install the thing

there are countless times where i just install stuff buy literally guessing the package name and going:
Code: [Select]
sudo apt install xand then it just works
« Last Edit: January 18, 2021, 05:35:41 PM by Aide33 »

anyways i click the firefox icon 2 times and it opens then i can browse the web how about you guys

i have a keybind that opens chrome

either you have never tried to use linux or you are simply too stupid to accomplish simple and straightforward tasks
using MSVC with literally anything that isn't VS is either an ungodly hassle or virtually impossible. it's literally easier to install mingw and use gcc than it is to use microsoft's software on microsoft's operating system
I tried ubuntu and debian. Got a ~85% on my linux exam. Got a stuffty cisco certificate on linux ill probably never use. Have a linux server classes. Installed Arch and a desktop environment just yesterday and I still hate it.

Windows just work right out of the box, no questions asked. + Actually has software support instead of having to run almost everything through wine