Author Topic: Shield help.  (Read 9587 times)

Here we go again...



4.Theoretically uranium should be the powerhouse since it's one of the heaviest metals known to man, but I suppose that would require a small nuclear reaction...(Oh and fyi all elements higher then the atomic number 100 are unstable)

Somebody call me?
<_<
>_>

Plutonium now makes you fly!

It doesnt work for people who has an IQ under 5

This includes: Anyone who still doesnt understand plutonuim elblems

Just to stand out, do you guys know that we always spend like literally 10 pages for "Teaching" This stuff to a moron? Funny how the stupid turn out to be like! :cookieMonster:

4.Theoretically uranium should be the powerhouse since it's one of the heaviest metals known to man, but I suppose that would require a small nuclear reaction...(Oh and fyi all elements higher then the atomic number 100 are unstable)

Somebody call me?
<_<
>_>

Woops, actully its Isotopes or something like that. Heres a clipping from an unknown source.
Quote from: Schoolwork
Stable nuclei are determined by the ratio of neutrons to protons. The greater the atomic number, the greater the number of neutrons necessary to keep the nucleus stable. The neutrons tend to act as a buffer among the protons, keeping them from repelling each other with such great force. Figure 9 shows the ratio n:p necessary to ensure a stable isotope. Notice that as the atom number increases, the number of neutrons must get larger to offset the increase in nuclear charge. Ratios that deviate very much from the curved line are unstable ratios and indicate radioactive isotopes of that particular element. No completely stable nuclei are in elements 83 and above. All isotopes of elements beyond bismuth (83) are unstable and radioactive.

You lost me when you started with the smart stuff. Well I meant to say...how can element like a gas be a solid?

H2O...........Dihydrogen Oxide

H20=Water h4x0rs=coke...ain XD